Overview

On May 1, Intel published a security advisory regarding a critical firmware vulnerability in certain systems that utilize Intel® Active Management Technology (AMT), Intel® Standard Manageability (ISM) or Intel® Small Business Technology (SBT). The vulnerability could enable a network attacker to remotely gain access to business PCs or devices that use these technologies. Consumer PCs with consumer firmware and data center servers using Intel® Server Platform Services are not affected by this vulnerability.

Until firmware updates are available, we urge people and companies using business PCs and devices that incorporate AMT, ISM or SBT to take steps to maintain the security of their systems and information.

We understand you may be concerned about this vulnerability. We have created this page to help you understand the issue, assess whether your system is impacted, and take appropriate action.

Resources

From Intel
Intel official security advisory: Technical details on the vulnerability; what products are vulnerable; recommendations on actions to take; links to technical resources for detection and mitigation of the vulnerability. This document is regularly updated.

Intel advisories for certain Intel® NUC, Intel® Compute Stick and Intel® Desktop Board products.

Detection guide: Tools and information to guide you through the process of evaluating if your systems are vulnerable.

Mitigation guide: Tools and information to help you secure systems impacted by this vulnerability prior to applying a firmware update.

 

Intel Customer Service
Online support: http://www.intel.com/supporttickets

Telephone in the U.S., Canada or Latin America: (916) 377-7000

Telephone numbers for Europe, Middle East and Africa

Telephone numbers for Asia Pacific

 

From Computer Makers
Computer manufacturers are publishing information specific to their products, including availability of firmware updates. Advisories for some manufacturers can be found at the following websites:

Dell Security Advisory

Fujitsu security advisory

HP security advisory

Lenovo security advisory

Intel® NUC, Compute Stick and Desktop Boards

FAQ

1. What is the problem?

On May 1, Intel published a security advisory regarding a firmware vulnerability in certain systems that utilize Intel® Active Management Technology (Intel® AMT), Intel® Standard Manageability (Intel® ISM), or Intel® Small Business Technology (Intel® SBT). The vulnerability is potentially very serious, and could enable a network attacker to remotely gain access to businesses PCs and workstations that use these technologies. We urge people and companies using business PCs and devices that incorporate Intel® AMT, Intel® ISM or Intel® SBT to apply a firmware update from your equipment manufacturer when available, or to follow the steps detailed in the mitigation guide.

 

2. What are Intel® Active Management Technology (Intel® AMT), Intel® Standard Manageability (Intel® ISM), or Intel® Small Business Technology (Intel® SBT)?

Intel® AMT and Intel® ISM are remote management tools typically used by system administrators at large organizations to manage large numbers of computers. Intel® SBT is a similar technology typically used by small and medium sized businesses with fewer devices to manage. All of these systems incorporate Intel manageability firmware.

 

3. Are servers impacted by this vulnerability?

Data center servers using Intel® Server Platform Services are not affected by this vulnerability. If you are uncertain, you should evaluate your systems to make sure they are secured against this vulnerability. Please see our detection guide for tools and instructions (currently available only for Microsoft Windows* operating systems). If your system is vulnerable, we strongly recommend applying the steps detailed in the mitigation guide, and applying a firmware update from your equipment manufacturer when available.

 

4. Are consumer PCs impacted by this vulnerability?

Consumer PCs with consumer firmware are not impacted by this vulnerability. If you are uncertain as to whether your system is vulnerable, or just want to be sure, please see our detection guide for tools and instructions, or contact Intel Customer Service.

 

5. Is a fix available?

We have implemented and validated a firmware update to address the problem, and we are cooperating with equipment manufacturers to make it available to end-users as soon as possible. Please check with your computer manufacturer for availability of firmware updates for your specific systems and other details. Computer manufacturers are publishing information specific to their products, including availability of firmware updates. Advisories for some manufacturers can be found at the following websites:

  • Dell security advisory

  • Fujitsu desktop security advisory

  • HP security advisory

  • Lenovo security advisory

  • Intel® NUC, Compute Stick and Desktop Boards

 

6. What if I have a vulnerable system for which no fix is available?

Until firmware updates are available, systems administrators can take the mitigation steps detailed in the mitigation guide published under our security advisory. Consumers or others who need support securing vulnerable systems can contact Intel Customer Support.

 

7. Where can I go for help? 

Computer manufacturers are publishing information specific to their products, including availability of firmware updates. Advisories for some manufacturers can be found at the following websites:

  • Dell security advisory

  • Fujitsu desktop security advisory

  • HP security advisory

  • Lenovo security advisory

  • Intel® NUCCompute Stick and Desktop Boards

Consumers or others who need support securing vulnerable systems can contact Intel Customer Support. Online support is available at http://www.intel.com/supporttickets. To contact Intel Customer Support by phone in the US, Canada, or Latin America call (916) 377-7000. Europe, Middle East and Africa support phone numbers can be found here. Asia Pacific support phone numbers can be found here.

 

8. I am a consumer but I use a business PC or workstation. What should I do?

You should evaluate your systems to make sure they are secured against this vulnerability. Please see our detection guide for tools and instructions. If your system is vulnerable, we strongly recommend applying the steps detailed in the mitigation guide, and applying a firmware update from your equipment manufacturer when available. Contact Intel Customer Service if you need support. 

 

9. I run a small business with business PCs. What should I do?

You should evaluate your systems to make sure they are secured against this vulnerability. Please see our detection guide for tools and instructions. If your system is vulnerable, we strongly recommend applying the steps detailed in the mitigation guide, and applying a firmware update from your equipment manufacturer when available. Contact Intel Customer Service if you need support. 

 

10. I have a business PC or workstation issued by my employer. What should I do?

In most cases, companies that issue PCs to employees will have systems administrators or IT professionals who manage updates and security for employees’ computers. You should speak to your company's IT department before taking any action with your PC with regard to this situation.

 

11. I use a consumer PC but I see manageability elements on it. What should I do?

If you are a consumer and you believe you may have purchased a PC with these capabilities, then you should evaluate your system to make sure it is secured against this vulnerability. Please see our detection guide for tools and instructions. If your system is vulnerable, we strongly recommend applying the steps detailed in the mitigation guide, and applying a firmware update from your equipment manufacturer when available. Contact Intel Customer Service if you need support. 

 

12. Is this a bug in the processor? If so, how can you fix it?

This is a vulnerability in the Intel® chipset firmware, not in the physical design of a processor. It can be addressed by applying a firmware update from your equipment manufacturer when available, or by applying the steps detailed in the mitigation guide.

 

13. What do you do to ensure the security of your products?

Intel has a set of policies, procedures, and practices called the Security Development Lifecycle (SDL) to help ensure our products meet specifications and security requirements. While no system is foolproof, there are mechanisms in place for Intel to work with computer manufacturers to address vulnerabilities should the need arise. When we receive reports of potential vulnerabilities in Intel® products, we work hard to assess them and respond appropriately so we can continue providing the security for our customers.